Procrastinating Yourself into the Grave

Healthy Life Extension

Funding Aging Research

Procrastinating Yourself into the Grave


posted on October 16th, 2012

Dear Future Centenarian,

By now, you understand you have a fighting chance for open-ended youthfulness and vitality.

Amazing emerging technologies will eventually deliver those promises. We and others are working our hearts out to raise the funds to help ensure they are developed during your lifetime. Will they mature while you™re still with us? That depends on several factors. Two are paramount.

Notably, it depends on how soon the projects get funded. Equally important, on an individual basis, is how long you stay alive on your own. Only you have control over the latter.

It amazes me how many people encourage us to fund the research while doing little to help themselves.

Years ago, I was invited to a famous actress™s home for lunch. She expressed a major interest in extreme longevity and the technologies that would make it a reality. Another guest was one of her nutritionist/healer/guru friends who advised her on everything from how to eat to how to take care of her pets and plants. She hung on his every word.

I spent the better part of a day there. By the time I left, she must have smoked two packs of cigarettes, and her parting words were: œLet me know when you have the pill.

The saddest part is, she™s typical. Her beauty, fame and wealth don™t matter. When it comes to health and longevity, she does what most people do¦ nothing!

Most of us have goals, and many are wellness related.

The ones that go unrealized usually mean you didn™t want them badly enough. Or maybe deep down inside, you didn™t really believe they were achievable or that you were not worthy of them.

So there goes your motivation. If that™s true for you, then of course you will tend to procrastinate. But I™m here to tell you, there™s every scientific reason why extreme longevity, rejuvenation and cures for everything that ails us are within reach. And you are worthy. You deserve perfect health and much more of everything you value. And in order to get them, you need to make an effort.

Let™s face it. Some of us are going to miss this opportunity. Are you going to be one of those left behind?

You know what to do to improve your odds of avoiding that tragedy. It™s simple, and it™s all in œSmart, Strong and Sexy at 100? in case you haven™t read it yet.

Sixty years ago, Senator Everett Dirksen may have said it best: "On the battlefields of indecision lie the bleached bones of thousands who in a moment of indecision waited and in waiting died."

More Life,
David Kekich
____________________________

LATEST HEADLINES FROM FIGHT AGING!

COMPARING LONGEVITY AND DAMAGE RESISTANCE IN BIVALVES Friday, October 12, 2012
Much like mammals, bivalve molluscs exhibit a very wide range of life spans. At the known outer end stands the arctic quahog at more than four centuries, and much studied in recent years so as to understand the roots of its longevity.

That research project is still ongoing, as are similar comparative studies of aging and longevity in a range of other species. Here, researchers compare resistance to various forms of physical stress and damage in different bivalve species.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2012/10/comparing-longevity-and-damage-resistance-in-bivalves.php

CONSIDERING LONGEVITY IN TERMS OF DAMAGE VERSUS DAMAGE REPAIR Friday, October 12, 2012
Here is a framework for thinking about aging and longevity: various forms of low-level biological damage accrue as a result of the operation of metabolism, degrading organs and tissues and ultimately causing death.

Where natural selection favors longer-lived individuals, mechanisms will evolve to repair, minimize, or resist the effects of this damage. So aging is driven by damage, but genetic programs interact with that damage, evolved to try to do something about it. Thus we could expect to be able to manipulate life span either by repairing damage or by altering the programs.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2012/10/considering-longevity-in-terms-of-damage-versus-damage-repair.php

TREATING NEURODEGENERATION BY INCREASING NEURAL PLASTICITY Thursday, October 11, 2012
One line of research into treatments for neurodegenerative disorders involves spurring the brain to establish new neural connections to replace those that have been damaged or lost.

This seems like an inferior strategy in comparison to trying to identify and remove root causes, one that can only delay the inevitable, but it's nonetheless a fairly entrenched field of work. Here is an example of this sort of research - and note that as for other similar efforts there are hints that an induced increase in neural plasticity would be beneficial for cognitive function in all older individuals:

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2012/10/treating-neurodegeneration-by-increasing-neural-plasticity.php

WORKING THYROID CELLS CREATED FROM STEM CELLS Thursday, October 11, 2012
Nature here notes progress towards tissue engineering of replacement thyroid glands and a demonstration of the ability to repair the thyroid in situ:

"The thyroid is the latest in a growing list of body parts that can now be 'fixed' in mice, with the potential to treat diseases from diabetes to Parkinson's. Progress has been very rapid over the past decade.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2012/10/working-thyroid-cells-created-from-stem-cells.php

COMPLICATIONS IN DEVELOPING DRUGS TO SLOW AGING Wednesday, October 10, 2012
Trying to safely slow down aging, usually by developing drugs to replicate some of the metabolic and epigenetic alterations caused by calorie restriction or exercise, is an immensely complicated undertaking.

Success will be slow in coming, and the end result will be of little use for those already old - so other than an increase in the understanding of how metabolism and aging relate to one another, we should not expect this field of research to contribute much to the bottom line of our own longevity. Nonetheless, this is the mainstream of research into longevity science and where most of the money goes.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2012/10/complications-in-developing-drugs-to-slow-aging.php

COMMENTARY ON FGF SIGNALING AND STEM CELL AGING Wednesday, October 10, 2012
You'll recall that researchers recently demonstrated that they could slow or reverse stem cell decline with age by manipulating FGF2 - in the satellite cell population that maintains muscle tissue, at least.

Based on their work, the researchers proposed that stem cell aging involves issues with dormancy and recuperation. Because of certain changes in signaling in the supporting stem cell niche, stem cell populations in old muscles are not able to remain dormant sufficiently well to maintain their numbers and functionality.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2012/10/commentary-on-fgf-signaling-and-stem-cell-aging.php

CONVERTING SUPPORTING BRAIN CELLS INTO NEW NEURONS Tuesday, October  9, 2012
Spurring the brain to produce new neurons more rapidly than it ordinarily does may be a useful form of therapy for a range of conditions - and also quite possibly something you'd want turned on as a matter of course, if it manifests the same sort of benefits to cognitive health as are produced by drugs that induce greater neural plasticity.

Here, researchers note an alternative to manipulating stem cell populations into building new neurons - instead work to convert some of the supporting cells in the brain into neurons:

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2012/10/converting-supporting-brain-cells-into-new-neurons.php

LUNG HEALTH AND BRAIN FUNCTION Tuesday, October  9, 2012
There is a fair amount of research linking general health with the pace at which brain function declines with age: the less robust you are, the more likely you are to get dementia.

We can look at the structural integrity and level of age-related decline in blood vessels in the brain as one possible mechanism to link such things as exercise and fitness to brain health, but there are undoubtedly others. Here researchers look at links between lung health and brain function.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2012/10/lung-health-and-brain-function.php

AN EXAMPLE OF PRESENT STEM CELL THERAPY TRIALS Monday, October  8, 2012
The range of stem cell therapies now moving from the lab to the clinic - via the slow, expensive, and largely unnecessary regulatory process of clinical trials - are a long way advanced from the state of the art even as recently as a decade ago.

Use of a patient's own cells, engineered and manipulated to improve the chances of a successful outcome, is the new standard.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2012/10/an-example-of-present-stem-cell-therapy-trials.php

THE GLENN FOUNDATION FUNDS ANOTHER NEW AGING RESEARCH LAB Monday, October  8, 2012
In recent years the Glenn Foundation for Medical Research has established a number of laboratories focused on aging research, building and funding an infrastructure to help grow and sustain this scientific community.

The Foundation has donated modestly to SENS research to reverse aging in the past, but these laboratories are firmly in the mainstream of biogerontology. The researchers involved typically investigate mechanisms of aging and ways to slow aging only - this being the slow, hard road ahead that will never lead to methods of rejuvenation.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2012/10/the-glenn-foundation-funds-another-new-aging-research-lab.php

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