22 Things Long Lived People Do Differently

Healthy Life Extension

Funding Aging Research

22 Things Long Lived People Do Differently

Dear Future Centenarian,

Happy people live longer. Conversely, negative thoughts, words and actions cause stress, inflammation, shorten your telomeres and send harmful signals to every one of your trillions of cells.

Joe Mercola posted an article on his site last week that fits beautifully into the longevity wheelhouse. I changed the title slightly from œ22 Things Happy People Do Differently. I eliminated or shortened the narratives for brevity, but you can see a full explanation of each point as well as the article at
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/04/08/22-happy-habits.aspx.

Dr. Mercola asks, œWhat™s the secret to being happy? and then continues with œYou can learn how to do it, just as you can learn any other skill.

It™s a great article, and I suggest you master these points if longevity (and happiness) are your goals.

  1. Let go of grudges. Letting go of a grudge frees you from negativity and allows more space for positive emotions to fill in.
  2. Treat everyone with kindness.
  3. Regard your problems as challenges. Eliminate the word œproblem from your mind entirely.
  4. Express gratitude for what you have.
  5. Dream big.
  6. Don™t sweat the small stuff. Happy people know how to let life™s daily irritations roll off their backs.
  7. Speak well of others. Talking negatively about others is like taking a bath in negative emotions.
  8. Avoid making excuses.
  9. Live in the present. Avoid replaying past negative events in your head or worrying about the future.
  10. Wake up at the same time every morning.
  11. Don™t compare yourself to others. Even regarding yourself as better than your peers is detrimental to your happiness, as you™re fostering judgmental feelings and an unhealthy sense of superiority.
  12. Surround yourself with positive people.
  13. Realize that you don™t need others™ approval.
  14. Take time to listen.
  15. Nurture social relationships.
  16. Meditate.
  17. Eat well.
  18. Exercise.
  19. Live minimally. Clutter has a way of sucking the energy right out of you and replacing it with feelings of chaos.
  20. Be honest. Every time you lie, your stress levels are likely to increase and your self-esteem will crumble just a little bit more.
  21. Establish personal control. Avoid letting other people dictate the way you live.
  22. Accept what cannot be changed.

 

This is not a test, but if it were, how well do you score? If not extremely high, you may be undermining your health. I™m weak on some and need to work on them.

It™s easy to gloss over little tips like these. Please don™t let their simplicity fool you. They are POWERFUL. Attitude drives everything, including the resolve to do the research and to get it funded.

Miserable people™s attitudes shorten their lives on the whole, even though they sufferingly FEEL like life is endless. So smile, laugh and be happy. You™ll live longer and enjoy it more.

More Life,
David Kekich
____________________________

LATEST HEADLINES FROM FIGHT AGING!

LIMITED EVIDENCE FOR THE UNIVERSALITY OF HEAT SHOCK HORMESIS AS A WAY TO INDUCE LONGEVITY Friday, April 12, 2013 Researchers here examine the published literature on hormesis via heat shock, one of the ways shown to induce modest gains in longevity in laboratory animals, and find less support for positive outcomes than was thought.

This may or may not be significant - the goal for researchers, as for calorie restriction and other means of extending longevity, is to find the underlying mechanism of action and build a therapy that triggers it with minimal side-effects.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/04/limited-evidence-for-the-universality-of-heat-shock-hormesis-as-a-way-to-induce-longevity.php

EXAMINING THE BIOCHEMISTRY OF ARCTICA ISLANDICA LONGEVITY Friday, April 12, 2013
The clam species Arctica islandica is very long-lived, reaching at least four centuries in the wild.

Researchers are comparing its biochemistry with similar but shorter-lived species to see if they can pinpoint the mechanisms that lead to its exceptional longevity. Here is recent research on this topic:

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/04/examining-the-biochemistry-of-arctica-islandica-longevity.php

ON INTERMITTENT FASTING Thursday, April 11, 2013
Here is a popular science article on intermittent fasting, something that extends life in mice, but which is not as well researched as calorie restriction, the gold standard for science on healthy life extension.

There appears to be considerable overlap in the mechanisms involved in calorie restriction and intermittent fasting, but it's not all exactly the same when gene expression patterns are examined, to pick one example.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/04/on-intermittent-fasting-2.php

ENGINEERED STEM CELLS SHOW PROMISE IN HEART THERAPY TRIAL Thursday, April 11, 2013
Modest progress is demonstrated in a recent stem cell therapy trial for heart failure, putting some ballpark numbers to the level of benefits obtained by patients in reputable overseas clinics for some years now.

It is to be expected that this sort of published result will lend further support for medical tourism while these therapies remain restricted and largely unavailable in countries like the US, thanks to the heavy hand of the FDA and similar regulatory bodies.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/04/engineered-stem-cells-show-promise-in-heart-therapy-trial.php

BUILDING BETTER BLOOD VESSELS Wednesday, April 10, 2013
One of the major hurdles in tissue engineering is populating tissue with blood vessels sufficient to support it.

This is absolutely essential to enable the growth of anything more than a tiny amount of tissue. Decellularization has proven to be a useful way to work around present limits, but that requires donor tissue in order to obtain the guiding extracellular matrix structure.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/04/building-better-blood-vessels.php

SUPPORT FOR RADICAL LIFE EXTENSION IN CANADIAN PUBLIC SURVEY Wednesday, April 10, 2013
An interesting result here, given that most surveys of the public conducted in recent years show mixed interest or a lack of interest in greatly extending healthy human life via medical biotechnology.

Perhaps measurable progress in changing minds and educating the public is occurring now - and certainly such progress should speed up at some point after a slow start - but we need to see more such encouraging surveys before drawing that conclusion:

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/04/support-for-radical-life-extension-in-canadian-public-survey.php

KIDNEY DISEASE RISK IS ANOTHER REASON NOT TO BE OVERWEIGHT Tuesday, April  9, 2013
Being overweight appears to behave much as though you are accumulating damage to your biology.

The more time you spend being overweight and the more excess visceral fat tissue you carry, the greater your risk of suffering age-related conditions later in life, the greater your lifetime medical expenditures, and the shorter your life expectancy.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/04/kidney-disease-risk-is-another-reason-not-to-be-overweight.php

AN EXAMPLE OF THE EVOLUTION OF LIFE SPAN Tuesday, April  9, 2013
Life span in a species is an evolved trait: if longer lives provide a competitive advantage over shorter-lived peers, then a species will tend to become longer lived over time.

We humans are long-lived for our size in comparison to other mammals, and the current thinking on that is that it may have to do with our intelligence and social nature
- there is a selection effect based on advantages to survival provided by the presence of post-reproductive elders in a collaborative environment.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/04/an-example-of-the-evolution-of-life-span.php

CONSIDERING TRANSPOSONS AND NEURODEGENERATION IN AGING FLIES Monday, April  8, 2013
You might recall a recent article on transposons as a form of more aggressive genetic damage and disarray in the later stages of aging.

It is unclear as to whether this is a secondary effect or whether it does in fact contribute to age-related decline at that stage; the arguments would be much the same as those made for other forms of stochastic DNA damage in aging.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/04/considering-transposons-and-neurodegeneration-in-aging-flies.php

MORE CHIMERIC ANTIGEN RECEPTOR BASED CANCER TARGETING Monday, April  8, 2013
Immune cells can be engineered to selectively target cancer cells for destruction via use of chimeric antigen receptors that match up with proteins that are more common on the exterior of a cancer cell.

This strategy has been in the news of late with impressive successes against leukemia. Here researchers show that better results can be obtained by chaining together two marginal targets, each of which is only slightly discriminating for cancer cells if used on its own.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/04/more-chimeric-antigen-receptor-based-cancer-targeting.php

 

DISCLAIMER:  News summaries are reported by third parties, and there is no guarantee of accuracy. This newsletter is not meant to substitute for your personal due diligence and is not to be taken as medical advice. For originating report, please see www.fightaging.org/

David A. Kekich
Maximum Life Foundation
www.MaxLife.org

"Where Biotech, Infotech and Nanotech
     Meet to Reverse Aging by 2033"

 

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