Only One Way to Keep Your Wealth Intact

Healthy Life Extension

Funding Aging Research

Only One Way to Keep Your Wealth Intact


posted on January 8th, 2013

Dear Future Centenarian,

James Clement sent me this wonderfully apropos quote by Ryan Waggoner:

œYouth is the ultimate wealth, and you™re a bit poorer today.

And last week, I got an essay from Reason which I modified slightly that hits the nail on the head. http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2012/12/longevity-research-donate-now-or-donate-later.php

Life is a sequence of decisions involving time and resources: how much, how long, now, or later? Everything from choosing a career to deciding whether to reach for the salt passes through the engine in your mind that weighs costs and time. In this, helping to further the advance of longevity science is the same as any other human endeavor.

We choose when to support research, we try to pick the best research to support based on likely outcomes, and we choose how much support to give.

You could choose to invest in promising life-extending companies or technologies or donate resources today to organizations like the SENS Research Foundation or Maximum Life Foundation. Or you could wait to invest or donate in some future year. Here are some arguments to either side:

Investing or Donating Later

On balance, I™m likely to have more resources to donate later. If I soundly invest what I would have donated now, it™ll most likely be worth more in later years. This isn™t certain, but a reasonable expectation.

The cost of life science research is falling dramatically. If I donate the same amount later, more can be accomplished, and more rapidly, than now.

Investing or Donating Now

Work that isn't accomplished today will have to be accomplished tomorrow. It may be faster and cheaper to complete that research project if we start twenty years from now, but what if we could be long done by then, even though today's progress is slow and expensive by comparison? Every year shaved from the time taken to develop new medicines means many lives saved.

If you don't use money when you have it, it has a way of vanishing amid life's slings and arrows. Not investing or donating today easily turns into not doing so at all. Just as "paying yourself first" is the way to enforce savings in spite of your worse nature, so maintaining a steady stream of investments and donations today is the way to ensure that you actually make a difference.

Without providing support now, a range of researchers and organizations that can make best use of your resources may not emerge to accept later funds. Growth in the sciences is as much about establishing institutions that have authority and continuity as anything else. Funds here and now are needed for all of their functions: drawing new researchers into the field; bringing respect to the field; communicating to the public; educating students.

No great research community, dedicated to a cause, arises spontaneously from nothing. Years or decades of steadily increasing funds and incremental progress are required.

Investing or donating now encourages other people to do so very soon. It™s a form of persuasion, granting legitimacy in other people's eyes to the project you favor. When you don™t invest or donate now, you miss the chance to persuade others now.

In Conclusion:

Invest or donate now. Unless you find yourself in the rare and envious position of knowing in certainty that a stupendous pile of money will land in your bank account in years to come. In which case, invest or donate both now and after that fortunate event.

Over the years, Reason, I and possibly you have watched many people churning their way through the energetic startup communities, putting off many things in their lives because of the conviction that they would have time and much money to deal with them later. Among the ways to wealth, it™s true that doing a good job of starting a company (and a good job of being networked while doing it) is the best shot at success - but best is far from a sure thing, or even a good chance.

I can assure you that most of the people involved in that world do not end up wealthy enough to have justified putting off most things.

The same, at a more sedate pace, applies to the rest of us. Tomorrow is what we build today. If we set down no bricks, there will be no wall.

SENS is well equipped to fund identified research projects. MaxLife is focusing more on creating investment opportunities. A venture fund is being formed for wealthy investors, and smaller private investments for accredited investors may also be available.

Remember, the more youth you let slip away, the poorer you get.

More Life,
David Kekich
____________________________

LATEST HEADLINES FROM FIGHT AGING!

DOPAMINE RECEPTOR VARIANT ASSOCIATED WITH LONGEVITY Friday, January  4, 2013 This research illustrates one of the many challenges associated with untangling genetic contributions to longevity; some of those genes affect personality traits that are also known to correlate with longevity: "A variant of a gene associated with active personality traits in humans seems to also be involved with living a longer life.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/dopamine-receptor-variant-associated-with-longevity.php

UCP1 EXTENDS LONGEVITY VIA HORMESIS? Friday, January  4, 2013
Uncoupling proteins affect mitochondrial function, altering the balance of energy going to heat versus building ATP molecules to store it for use elsewhere.

Like a range of other mitochondrial manipulations, altering levels of uncoupling proteins can extend life in laboratory animals, and here researchers suggest this works via hormesis, causing just enough damage to spur repair mechanisms to greater ongoing effects for a net overall gain:

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/ucp1-extends-longevity-via-hormesis.php

TFP5  SHOWS PROMISE FOR TREATING ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE Thursday, January  3, 2013
A new candidate for building an Alzheimer's therapy shows promise in mice: "When a molecule called TFP5 is injected into mice with disease that is the equivalent of human Alzheimer's, symptoms are reversed and memory is restored - without obvious toxic side effects.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/tfp5-shows-promise-for-treating-alzheimers-disease.php

DOES LICHEN AGE? Thursday, January  3, 2013

There are many candidates for ageless organisms, such as the hydra or the lobster, and some that have been revealed to in fact age in recent years as research costs fall far enough to allow these niche questions to be answered.

Bacteria, for example, do age, but that was only conclusively established comparatively recently. Aging is not a large field in comparison to the life science mainstream, which is one of the reasons why there are so many unanswered questions relating to aging in various species. Here is a fairly typical example

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/does-lichen-age.php

A FRENCH INTERVIEW WITH AUBREY DE GREY Wednesday, January  2, 2013
In the French language press, translated via machine: "[JOL Press]: You are often described as "the man who tries to make us immortal."

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/a-french-interview-with-aubrey-de-grey.php

REDUCED FRATAXIN EXPRESSION EXTENDS LIFE IN NEMATODES Wednesday, January  2, 2013
Many of the methods of extending life in laboratory animals involve boosting levels of autophagy, the cellular housekeeping processes that remove damaged components and unwanted proteins.

Here is another of them: "Severe mitochondria deficiency leads to a number of devastating degenerative disorders, yet, mild mitochondrial dysfunction in different species, including the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, can have pro-longevity effects.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/reduced-frataxin-expression-extends-life-in-nematodes.php

IN SEARCH OF THE ROOTS OF HEAT SHOCK HORMESIS Tuesday, January  1, 2013
The heat shock response can induce hormetic benefits: repair and maintenance systems are spurred to greater activity for some time, leading to a healthier, longer-lived organism.

Researchers are in search of the pivotal mechanisms of this process, with an eye to targeting them in therapies: ""That which does not kill us, makes us stronger"

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/in-search-of-the-roots-of-heat-shock-hormesis.php

A NEW RECORD FOR HUMAN MALE LONGEVITY Tuesday, January  1, 2013
One of the expected signs of an upward trend in longevity is the setting of new records in maximum human life span, and an increase in the number of people getting closer to that record.

The longest documented human life, that of Jeanne Calment, was an unusual statistical outlier, however, so despite progress that record will stand for a while at the current rate of increase in elder life expectancy.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/a-new-record-for-human-male-longevity.php

EARLY GROWTH RATE AND AGING Monday, December 31, 2012
From earlier this month, something to think about in the context of reliability theory and life span: "Manipulating growth rates in stickleback fish can extend their lifespan by nearly a third or reduce it by 15 percent.

[Researchers] altered the growth rate of 240 fish by exposing them to brief cold or warm spells, which put them behind or ahead their normal growth schedule. Once the environmental temperature was returned to normal, the fish got back on track by accelerating or slowing their growth accordingly. However, the change in growth rate also affected their rate of ageing.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2012/12/early-growth-rate-and-aging.php

REVIEWING THE MECHANISMS OF MUSCLE ATROPHY Monday, December 31, 2012
Muscle mass and strength diminish with age, and researchers are making steady progress into understanding exactly why this is the case.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2012/12/reviewing-the-mechanisms-of-muscle-atrophy.php

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