What is Most Important if You Were Dying?

Healthy Life Extension

Funding Aging Research

What is Most Important if You Were Dying?


posted on November 27th, 2012

Dear Future Centenarian,

I™ll bet it™s not your most current pressing issue.

We have seen people around us age, degenerate and die all our lives, so we naturally take it for granted. They did too, until it happened to them. Then, their conditions œsuddenly became the most important thing in their lives.

They so considered aging a natural part of life that they pushed the consequences so far back in their minds that most of them seemed to be caught off guard when their time came. The only preparations most took were getting their wills and life insurance policies in place. Then they went merrily along the deadly path of deterioration until it was too late to do anything about it.

As Dr. Andrew Galambos said, œNobody gets old by surprise.

You might say, œIt™s inevitable, so why should I worry about aging when I can be enjoying life? There are lots of variations of that thought process. But in essence, most throw in the towel when there™s lots of fight and life left in them.

Well I™m here to tell you that this whole degenerative process is not so inevitable after all. But it will be if we let it.

On a personal level, what can you do about your own aging process? As it turns out¦ plenty! First, let me explain my rationale for new subscribers.

We know how people can add 5-20 healthy active years to their lives depending on factors such as your current state of health, lifestyle habits and age. You can find how to do so in Smart, Strong and Sexy at 100? We knew a lot of these œsecrets for over a century, and of course we know more now. But a century ago, extra years simply meant you lived better and died later.

Now, for the first time in history, those extra years could bring you close to the time when radical life-extending technologies will be available to you. So those bonus years could be the difference between your being part of the last generation to suffer and die from aging instead of being part of the first generation with a shot at open-ended youthfulness.

It takes effort to get these technologies developed, and we are pitching in. One counterproductive effort though, is overcoming inertia and even resistance to extreme longevity.

Many dubious arguments support aging and involuntary death: every status quo, no matter how terrible, gathers its supporters. This is one of the deeper flaws inherent in human nature, the ability to mistake what is the most desirable for what is possible. A hundred thousand deaths each and every day and the suffering of hundreds of millions is the proposal on the table whenever anyone suggests that human aging should continue as it is.

Over a trillion dollars have been thrown at aging symptoms while ignoring the cause of most of the diseases that kill us¦ aging itself. We™re so used to fighting symptoms, that we lose sight of the causes.

One reason is, we didn™t know enough about what causes various symptoms. Until we learn, we do the best we can do ease suffering. You break a leg, have your bone reset, and you get a splint. You get sick, and the doctor waves magical bones and feathers over you. Then as medicine started getting more œscientific, doctors practiced bloodletting. Now you get cancer, and doctors poison your whole body with massive doses of radiation and chemicals. Someday this will seem as barbaric as witchdoctors and bloodletting.

Once we identify the causes of diseases and learn how to treat them proactively, the symptoms quit manifesting themselves. That™s what we™re closing in on now “ how to treat and prevent aging, the root cause of most diseases. And we™re called heretics for doing so, because we™re taking people out of their comfort zones. We dare to obsolete the familiar.

But in this age of biotech, nanotech and infotech, a small but rapidly growing number of rejuvenation advocates will eventually drown out the philosophers, ethicists and other deathists who are currently sacrificing hundreds of millions of lives by delaying what should be a no-brainer international priority.

Meanwhile, progress is painfully slow, since the majority spend their lives chasing short-term gratifying dreams and pursuits and seemingly necessary responsibilities¦ instead of temporarily taking themselves out of their comfort zones to accomplish long-term satisfaction.

As Reason so eloquently states, œGiven many more healthy years of life in which to do so, we would lead quite different lives. Arguably better lives, not diverted by necessity into a long series of tasks we do not want to undertake, carried out for the sake of what will come. We could follow desire rather than need: work to achieve the aims that we want to achieve, not those forced on us.

œBecause of aging and death, we are not free while we are alive “ and in any collection of slaves there are those who fear the loss of their chains. The longer they are enslaved, the less their vision of freedom. Sadly, in the mainstream of our culture, it is those voices that speak the loudest."

See more on this topic at:

http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2012/10/putting-aside-what-youd-rather-do-because-youre-dying.php

More Life,
David Kekich
____________________________

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