“Immortality” or “Ammortality?”

Healthy Life Extension

Funding Aging Research

"Immortality" or "Ammortality?"


posted on October 09th, 2012

Dear Future Centenarian,

The word œimmortal is loosely tossed around among people who want more life. One of Greta Blackburn™s friends coined an appropriate term, œammortal.

Let™s make the definition something along the lines of œan open-ended youthful lifespan. Maybe we could expand it to include the concept of never dying from aging. That™s our goal.

Immortality is often linked to living forever or eternally, and eternal is outside of time “ no beginning or end. That could of course mean outside the universe. That™s why I don™t like to use the word œimmortality as one of our goals. It™s also linked to mythology.

But people have been using ™immortal and œforever both accurately and to mean not dying from aging¦ to who knows what for so long that a new precise word may be timely.

Unless you know speakers™ definitions of their words, how do you communicate? For example, you may be trying to convince someone of the positive aspects of œammortality by using terms such as immortal and forever, and they know, at least subconsciously, that your argument is absurd, they shut you out and consider you to be a freak. They are also probably programmed to reject any radical concept that interferes with their core beliefs.

For example, as subscriber James Boanerges points out, the reason so few people want to live œforever is that we feel a need for time structuring. Each of us, at a young age, writes our œlife script, and then live it out and die accordingly. Generally we get the life script from our family tradition, and die at about the same time as our parents of the same disease or condition. Unless we are aware of our life script, we may follow it unconsciously to the end.  

Vitamins, diet and exercise may help, but to keep from dying "on schedule," it is vitally important to rewrite our life script to allow for more time, and you can always change it later. So if an unlimited lifetime is unacceptable (as it is to 98% of the people), you can make it !00, or 120 and then up it to 150, etc.

And to turn that 98% into say 49%, a real life demonstration or proof of concept of reversing aging will probably be needed, since open-ended lifespans may not be as objectionable as we think. It may not be unacceptable, just unbelievable.

Tom Murtaugh, another subscriber, and I maintain that it will be a visual treatment for some aspect of aging: erasing wrinkles, reversing grey hair, hair regrowth... etc. that will open the minds of the billions.
 
In the film ET, there is a scene towards the end when ET is thought to be dead¦ but he is not.  The boy Henry comes to realize this when he sees a dead pot of flowers returning to life. Growing younger and basically returning from death visually. 

People grasp what they see. The word œunderstand does not speak to this but the words "insight" "I see" "clarification" "vision" and others are integral to our language because so much of our languages are based on the visual. The eyes. Even radio ads, which are purely sonic, try to evoke images in the mind of the listener. 

More Life,
David Kekich
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