How Long Would You Like to Live?

Healthy Life Extension

Funding Aging Research

How Long Would You Like to Live?


posted on September 3rd, 2012

Dear Future Centenarian,

What is a full life? Elvis lived for 42 years. Many say he lived a full life while others say an 85 year olds life was full, regardless of how interesting.

What do you think? I™ll give you my answer in a moment.

First, let me tell you the results of an over 30,000 person survey who were asked how long they wanted to live. Their choices were 80, 120 and 150 years and forever. The results were not surprising to me, and I™ll tell you why before I give you my choice. Here are the answers:

80 years “ 58.76%
120 years “ 29.43%
150 years “ 9.69%
Forever “ 2.12%

The majority didn™t want to live any longer than about today™s average life expectancy. That™s most likely because people typically equate longevity with rapid decline, loss of independence and pain or sickness.

Most of those who want to live to 120 probably understand concepts such as œ100 is the new 50 and are aware of some of the life-extending technologies.

150 years. Here™s where it starts getting interesting. For almost 10% of the respondents, 120 wasn™t good enough. They want more and figure modern medicine can keep them well, even at 150.

Forever. Here are some reasons why I think almost 98% said they didn™t want this one:

  1. They don™t think it™s possible.
  2. They think they would be bored.
  3. It™s against nature or God™s will to be immortal.
  4. We would run out of resources and/or room if people lived forever.
  5. They would not want to live without their family and friends.

 

I answer these objections and more in Appendix B in Smart, Strong and Sexy at 100? The objections I address are to extreme life extension, not to immortality. The book™s theme is not immortality. It™s about adding youthful decades with more, maybe later, and why all that will be possible.

More than 600 of the respondents don™t agree with any of the 98% respondents™ rationales. For one reason or another, they want to live forever, and they probably have more imagination than most of the other 29,000+.

How long do you want to live? You can answer that question formally by taking the poll at http://www.whenim164.com.

Now here™s my answer to what I consider a full life to be:

œIt™s one that is open-ended with limitless possibilities, productive and interesting. I think we get short-changed with less, once it™s possible. And that™s yet another reason why it™s so urgent that we get the research funded.

And how did I answer the survey question? No surprise. Since 150 is not long enough for me (in good health of course), I chose œforever but with some qualifications.

Forever may not be possible¦ for anything. Forever has no end, but the universe may eventually end. Or maybe not. Also, forever gives you no escape clause. That would mean you couldn™t choose to end it if you wanted, no matter what good reason you might have.

I would have preferred the choice to have been œopen-ended. That™s more realistic. But I didn™t design the survey.

More Life,
David Kekich

P.S. Do you have young children or grandchildren? Then you may want to see how to make them smarter. http://www.onlinecollegecourses.com/2012/08/27/exercise-makes-you-smarter/
____________________________

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