An Endangered Longevity Hero

Healthy Life Extension

Funding Aging Research

An Endangered Longevity Hero


posted on January 22nd, 2013

Dear Future Centenarian,

When I moved back to California almost 13 years ago, one of the first persons I made it a point to meet was Stephen Coles, M.D, Ph.D.

I moved back here to be closer to life extension researcher as well as the life extension œcommunity. Steve Coles is one of the more prominent members, as well as one of a select few who are actually making something happen to give you more active years.

He founded the Gerontology Research Group (GRG) in 1990, tirelessly runs the organization and moderates its extremely active discussion group. GRG is primarily made up of physicians, scientists, and engineers dedicated to the quest to slow and ultimately reverse human aging within the next 20 years. See www.GRG.org.

Steve also co-founded and directs the Supercentenarian Research Foundation. A supercentenarian is one who reaches the age of 110. Genetically, they™re different than most of us. In fact, there are less than 100 validated supercentenarians in the whole world.

That™s right. Without out the efforts of people like Steve, your chances of living that long are less than 1 million to one.

After age 90 or so, genetics are the biggest determinant of how long we will live. Their secrets are hidden in their DNA. So if we wanted to unravel the genetic secrets to longevity, who better to study than those rare supercentenarians?

Steve Coles spends a good portion of his life collecting their DNA, determining their causes of death when they die and helping ensure the data is properly studied to see how we could someday soon tweak our genes for greater longevity and better resistance to disease.

Steve has more than a full schedule. Did I mention his lecture, studying and writing responsibilities?

You might wonder how he would find time to practice medicine.

He doesn™t.

Steve gave up a potentially lucrative medical career to help unravel the mysteries of aging. You see, he figures he can save more lives by stopping the premature deaths of the 100,000 people we lose to aging daily than by treating patients one at a time.

Steve loves what he does, even though he could make more money fixing cars.

But suddenly, ironically, a serious aging-related disease caught up to Steve at the young age of 72. Steve œcelebrated his birthday last Saturday by slowly recovering from a massively invasive six-hour pancreatic cancer surgery. He was diagnosed Christmas Eve.

In less than two months, he starts specialized chemotherapy. And this all costs money¦ more money than Steve has.

While he was working on behalf of all people in this world, he sacrificed accumulating a personal nest egg.

Steve is one of the brightest, gentlest and dedicated men I have ever known. Few of the billions in this world who will benefit from his tireless research will ever even hear his name. But they will owe him big time.

I hope you have it in your heart to make him a gratitude donation. Any small (or large J) donation will be greatly appreciated and sorely needed.

A friend of Steve made donating easy. You can go to the following website and donate online with a few clicks and keystrokes. If you use this option, you might notice the payee is Electra McBurnie. That™s Steve™s daughter. Here™s the URL:

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/Dr-Coles-Pancreatic-Cancer-Fund/38618

Or, if you™d prefer to donate by check, you can do so as well. Here™s Steve™s address:

Dr. Stephan Coles
3302 W. 181st Place
Torrance, CA 90504

Thank you again, and with Steve™s help, I wish you¦

More Life,
David Kekich
____________________________

LATEST HEADLINES FROM FIGHT AGING!

SARCOPENIA CORRELATES WITH INCREASED MORTALITY Friday, January 18, 2013
As might be expected, older people with a greater loss of muscle mass and strength - the condition known as sarcopenia - also tend to exhibit a higher risk of death:

"Sarcopenia has been indicated as a reliable marker of frailty and poor prognosis among the oldest individuals. We evaluated the impact of sarcopenia on the risk of all-cause death in a population of frail older persons living in community.

Read More  http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/sarcopenia-correlates-with-increased-mortality.php

LUMINESCENT MARKING OF CELLULAR SENESCENCE Friday, January 18, 2013
Here is news of a research tool for those developing ways to target and destroy senescent cells.

A successful method should minimize the contribution of cellular senescence to degenerative aging and thus extend healthy life - this is one of the necessary biotechnologies for human rejuvenation that is closest to actual implementation:

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/luminescent-marking-of-cellular-senescence.php

PLASTINATION WILL HAVE ITS CHALLENGES, JUST LIKE CRYONICS Thursday, January 17, 2013
Plastination seems to have the potential to become a viable alternative to cryonics as a long-term storage method for the brains of those who die before the advent of rejuvenation biotechnology.

If the fine structure that encodes the data of the mind is preserved, then these individuals can wait indefinitely for the arrival of molecular nanotechnology needed to restore them to life.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/plastination-will-have-its-challenges-just-like-cryonics.php

MORE ON SESTRINS AND LONGEVITY Thursday, January 17, 2013
Sestrins have been linked to life span in flies, and here researchers look at the analogs in nematode worms. I've yet to notice similar work for mice, however:

"Aging is a process of gradual functional decline leading to death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to oxidative stress and cell damage that lead to aging but also serve as signaling molecules.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/more-on-sestrins-and-longevity.php

REDUCING AMYLOID BETA LEVELS IN A MOUSE MODEL OF ALZHEIMER'S Wednesday, January 16, 2013
This is one of a number of approaches in recent years that has significantly reduced the levels of amyloid beta in the brain in the mouse version of Alzheimer's disease used for research.

As for the others, it remains to be seen whether it is a suitable basis for a human therapy. Even if so, like much of the approach of modern medicine for age-related conditions, it isn't addressing causes, only trying to patch over consequences:

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/reducing-amyloid-beta-levels-in-a-mouse-model-of-alzheimers.php

SOLVENTS INCREASE LIFE IN NEMATODE WORMS Wednesday, January 16, 2013
This result is reminiscent of the demonstration that ethanol produces significant life extension in nematodes - and similarly, one wonders whether it will be confirmed, and if so why it wasn't noted a long time ago.

If it is accurate, it casts doubt on a range of life span studies that used the solvents in question. "Lifespan extension through pharmacological intervention may provide valuable tools to understanding the mechanisms of aging and could uncover new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of age-related disease.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/solvents-increase-life-in-nematode-worms.php

ADENINE IN THE DIET BLOCKS CALORIE RESTRICTION BENEFITS IN FLIES Tuesday, January 15, 2013
Work continues on finding the mechanisms for longevity induced through calorie restriction.

This latest paper seems to be as interesting a step forward in this regard as the establishment of dietary methionine levels as a principle trigger for the health and longevity benefits obtained via calorie restriction.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/adenine-in-the-diet-blocks-calorie-restriction-benefits-in-flies.php

β-BLOCKERS MODESTLY EXTEND MEAN LIFE SPAN IN FLIES AND MICE Tuesday, January 15, 2013
It is good to see more researchers controlling for calorie restriction effects as a matter of course in their studies on health and life span:

"Chronic treatment with β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) agonists increases mortality and morbidity while βAR antagonists (β-blockers) decrease all-cause mortality for those at risk of cardiac disease.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/-blockers-modestly-extend-mean-life-span-in-flies-and-mice.php

ROS PRODUCTION NECESSARY FOR TADPOLE TAIL REGROWTH Monday, January 14, 2013
Many lower animals are capable of great feats of regeneration, and researchers are working to understand the mechanisms by which this occurs.

There is the possibility that the ability to regenerate lost body parts is something that lies dormant in mammals, rather than being completely lost.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/ros-production-necessary-for-tadpole-tail-regrowth.php

AN ESTIMATE OF THE WORLDWIDE COST OF DEMENTIA Monday, January 14, 2013
A research paper here puts forward an estimate for the cost of treating dementia - though the true economic burden must also consider opportunity costs: what might have been accomplished by patients had they not become disabled.

Dementia is but one of the many degenerative conditions of aging, of course, and all of the others have their costs as well. The overall cost of aging is staggering, and, sadly, rarely considered.

Read More http://www.fightaging.org/archives/2013/01/an-estimate-of-the-worldwide-cost-of-dementia.php

Back to Top