Dreams? Memories? Oblivion

Healthy Life Extension

Funding Aging Research

Dreams¦ Memories¦ Oblivion


posted on July 17th, 2012

Dear Future Centenarian,

Our futures are shaped by our dreams. Our pasts comprise a culmination of memories. Then¦ oblivion?

Realized and unrealized dreams turn to some of our most vivid memories which can be generally classified as good, mundane or bad. Dreams and plans are usually optimistic, upbeat and ambitious. Our plans tend to be rosy. Sometimes they work. Sometimes not.

So let™s take a look at your memories. Every recallable experience of your life fills your memory banks. More is added every second. The sum total makes up the experience and wisdom you acquired over the course of your life. Some of your memories are satisfying and happy. Some of those because you accomplished your grand plans along the way.

Most of our memories are fairly neutral and are made up of routines and things that were not especially important to you. Usually day-to-day stuff, the things that are not well retained since there was little if any emotion tied to them.

Then we have unhappy memories. Unrealized dreams for example. Also of course, traumatic experiences.

Our memories largely determine who we are. So what happens to them when we die?

No one knows. In spite of whatever you and I may believe about an afterlife, we don™t know. (Please don™t send me your opinions to the contrary. No one, living or dead, has ever been able to prove or disprove it.)

So there exists the possibility that there is oblivion at death. People may say they know otherwise, but knowledge is separate from belief.

Knowledge stands up under independent repeated objective tests as per the scientific method. Belief doesn™t. An interesting contrast between credible scientists and prominent mystics is, scientists allow for the possibility of being wrong, while faith-based people often don™t.

The bottom line regarding oblivion is, as much as I wish otherwise, there is no evidence to the contrary. Is the contrary possible? Sure. But since I don™t know, I manage my life hoping there is something after death but not counting on it. The fact is, this may be all we will ever experience. If so, doesn™t it make sense to make the most of it? Isn™t more quantity and quality better than uncertainty? If not, what have you lost?

If we can tap into some of the passionate emotions of belief in an afterlife to solving our health issues, œunsolveable problems such as age-reversal could be solved in your lifetime. Unshakeable beliefs can be among the strongest of motivators. In fact, even when beliefs may prove to be scientifically unsound, they tend to motivate more than knowledge. Much of our knowledge came into existence simply because those who had unshakeable beliefs that they would solve problems, discovered knowledge in their pursuits.

Lack of believability in the viability of age-reversing technologies is one reason why radical endeavors such as age-reversal are delayed.

I think this is the primary roadblock to raising the investment funds we need to solve aging in our lifetime.

Tragically, billionaires and paupers alike suffer and die prematurely, because the ones who can make a difference have not yet acquired enough knowledge to light a fire under them. They die rich and leave legacies. Wouldn™t you rather live your legacy?

Don™t you think the average billionaire would make a significant investment in research if he or she believed it would ensure gaining an extra youthful decade or two, let alone open-ended vitality? Of course. I™m sure some would give their last dime if full rejuvenation would be the payoff. But most don™t believe it yet.

This is one of the great tragedies of our time. It™s our job to educate those who can make a difference while they™re still here to find out.

More Life,
David Kekich
____________________________

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